Head injuries are one of the most common causes of death and severe injury for bicycle-related accidents. Traumatic brain injuries (TBIs) can involve any injury that causes impact damage to the brain. Even moderate TBIs can have life-altering consequences when it comes to cognitive and physical impairment. 

The benefits of helmet use

Despite critics debating the effectiveness of helmet use amongst bicyclists, studies show that they cut the risk of traumatic brain injuries by half. Wearing a helmet also reduces the likelihood that a cyclist involved in a crash will die from their injuries. According to current statistics, less than half of the millions of bicyclists in the US wear helmets. Though proficient cyclists may not feel the need to wear a helmet when they are confident in their handling and skill as a rider, the infrastructure of cities and towns are not always suited to bike riders. The lack of bike lanes and appropriate speed limits puts cyclists at risk from distracted and reckless drivers. Due to these risks, cyclists must understand the signs and symptoms of a traumatic brain injury:

  • Cognitive impairment
  • Difficulty concentrating
  • Memory loss
  • Coordination issues
  • Blurry vision
  • Headaches
  • Dizziness
  • Altered moods
  • Unconsciousness/coma
  • Seizures

Long-lasting medical conditions

A cyclist doesn’t have to have a direct head injury to receive a TBI. When cyclists collide with motor vehicles, the acceleration and deceleration of the rider’s body can cause their brain to impact the inside of the skull, causing injury. For serious TBIs, a person may need medical treatment for years to come, affecting their personal lives and livelihood.

Protecting the health of US cyclists

According to a troubling statistic, there were 900 deaths and roughly 494,000 ER visits due to bike injuries in 2013. If you or a relative was injured in a bicycle-related injury, contact an attorney with experience in personal injury related to bike injuries and TBIs.