The 2019 Global Traffic Scorecard released last Monday, revealing Los Angeles to be the sixth most congested city in America. The Scorecard is a metric used to measure traffic data and weigh the impact of regulations and relief programs aimed at reducing traffic congestion. For the first time ever, bicycle statistics were also included.

Los Angeles drivers know all-too-well just how bad it is out there. However, this report might reveal some surprising statistics that may change how drivers view their commute.

INRIX Global Traffic Scorecard

Before leaving for work, LA commuters should consider these facts:

  • Worst traffic corridors: Los Angeles is home to the top two worst traffic corridors in the nation. First place goes to a stretch of the Santa Ana Freeway that can consume up to 80 hours of a driver’s time every year. Second goes to the Hollywood Freeway, which can consume 76 hours. The 405 took ninth place with 56 hours lost every year.
  • Increasing rates of congestion: Four out of five of the most congested cities saw congestion decreases over the past three years. Washington D.C. was able to reduce traffic by 11%. LA’s congestion increased by 4%.
  • Time and money: On average, Americans lose 99 hours a year due to congestion, costing nearly $88 billion in 2019.
  • Faster by bike: Many slower areas rate slow enough speeds that make riding a bike often faster.

Other cities find alternative solutions

Trevor Reed, transportation analyst, said of the report, “The continued innovation and investment in smarter roadway management is showing early signs of progress.” Cities like D.C. have been improving their public transit infrastructure to reduce reliance on automobiles. Turning to bicycles is also an increasingly popular solution for cities like Minneapolis, 23rd in the nation for congestion with about 3.9% of the population commuting on bikes. In LA, less than 1% of commuters bike.

A safer alternative for LA

If trends continue, LA roads could show even worse numbers in the future. Many Los Angeles residents are finding success with bicycle commuting as it provides a faster and cleaner commute. If LA regulation can take more cars off the road, biking could become considerably safer as well.